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There’s A Campaign To Get Jarvis Cocker’s ‘Running The World’ To The Christmas Number One Spot

In 2006, Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker released the song ‘Running the World’. A sharp-toothed attack on the upper class and conservative political elite, lyrics include: “If you thought things had changed / Friend, you’d better think again / Bluntly put, in the fewest of words: / Cunts are still running the world.

Now, in light of the UK Conservative Party’s federal election win last week, a campaign has started on Facebook by fans Michael Hall and Darcie Molina to get Cocker’s song to the UK Number One slot in time for Christmas as a means of protest.

And it’s not doing so bad. According to The Official Charts Company, the song is currently sitting at Number 87, and is 5,000 sales away of cracking the Top 40. According to NME, the song has seen a 19,182% increase in Spotify streams in the UK since last Monday.

“It would be good for people to know that we’re not beaten yet. I know the country is a joke in the eyes of the world now, but there are a lot of us who aren’t on board with that,” Hall told NME. “We’re about inclusivity, representation, love, acceptance and kindness. It’s not hippie bullshit, it’s punk rock.”

Cocker himself has now publicly responded to the campaign’s creation, taking to Instagram to commend the action.

“I just want to say a very big thank you to everyone involved in this campaign to get “Cunts Are Still Running The World” to #1 for Xmas. What a lark!” wrote Cocker.

“I’m so proud that people have chosen the song as a means of protest against the social, political & environmental situation we find ourselves in. These are cold, hard times but initiatives like this campaign make me feel all warm & hopeful inside. Christmasy even,” Cocker said, adding that all proceeds from the single will go to homeless charity Shelter.

The Christmas Number One single will be announced on Friday, 20th December.

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